SafetySmart Xchange Blog

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10 Things a Safety Trainer Often Hears
In follow up to our previous article, we offer these oft-repeated phrases so you can better prepare yourself with responses for your next safety meeting.
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Is It Ever Safe to Pull a Pallet Jack?
I've looked everywhere on the net to try to answer my question. We have several employees who move pallet jacks by pulling with both arms behind their backs. It looks like this could strain the back much easier than pulling with one arm. Is this safe?
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9 Things Your Supervisors Should Know About Tool Box Talks
Tool box talks, tailgate meetings, safety time-outs, crew briefings - the names vary by industry. But no matter what you call them or what industry you're in, don't assume that your site supervisors or crew leaders embrace the need for these gatherings or even understand what you're asking them to pass on to employees.
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How to Determine Safe Stacking Heights
Last week, Catherine Jones, editor of SafetyXChange, received the following question from a SafetyXChange member in response to her article on stacking mismatched items: “I enjoyed reading your article about stacking oddball sized materials. I have a question. In the article you mentioned that materials should be stacked to a safe height. Is there any […]

16
Apr

Safety is Your Responsibility You shouldn't be waiting for someone to call you out while you're hanging a 'Safety First' poster and using a wobbly office chair in lieu of a step ladder. Getting injured on the job hurts you and your employer, so keep in mind these 8 steps to safety responsibility:

14
Apr

You’ve heard it before.  Why all the safety training meetings?  Why can’t we do them less often? While it can be challenging to keep your staff engaged, having more frequent safety meetings can improve your safety program. Here are some benefits of increasing their frequency: More opportunities to reinforce your message.  Take a note from the marketing profession:  you have to repeat the same message at least three times for it to sink in.  More frequent meetings do not suggest…

11
Apr

Tips for Preventing & Handling Disaster & Distress on the Job Article by: Timothy Dimoff, CPP, founder and president of SACS Consulting & Investigative Services, Inc. (www.sacsconsulting.com) Disgruntled employees, workplace bullies, active-shooter situations, illegal drug use, ex-spouses and dissatisfied clients – all can be found in a random sampling of the 2 million people affected by workplace violence in the United States, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. “Of course, of the millions of reported cases, there are many…

09
Apr

Surveys of safety professionals repeatedly show that regular safety meetings positively impact safety records. But how can you consistently deliver engaging safety meetings and training when there just isn’t that much time to find new material? Join Jessica Rihal, SafetySmart’s Senior Account Manager, as she shares how any size organization, from small contractors to Fortune 500 companies, can prepare engaging safety talks in 5 minutes or less. Date: Tuesday, May 6, 2014 Time: 12:00 pm EST/9:00am PST Duration: 30 minutes…

07
Apr

When planning for Take Your Kids to Work Day, it's important to keep the day well structured. Tours, product demonstrations, lunch with parents and hands-on activities are always a good idea. To help you select activities for the day, consider: The type of company you are; The age group you're dealing with; Your message. Will it be the value of education? The value of teamwork? The value of working safely? Here are a few suggestions for hands-on activities: --Break the…

04
Apr

Harassment in the workplace includes any objectionable behavior that demeans, belittles, humiliates or embarrasses an employee. It also includes intimidation and threats. Here are seven statistics related to workplace harassment/bullying: Three tactics used in workplace bullying are: withholding information from a co-worker; excluding certain employees from meetings and threatening or intimidating co-workers.   Ten percent of Canadian workers ages 18 through 24 reported being victims of sexual harassment in the workplace at some point within the previous year. (Canadian Labour…

02
Apr

Do These Sound Familiar? Thanks to John Bruce for this submission in response to last week's 10 Things a Safety Trainer Never Hears.   Honorable Mention (and my personal favorite): "Sure, I was skiing this weekend but I really hurt my back at work."   Submitted by: John Bruce - Safety Supervisor Loss Prevention Services Aurora Health Care

01
Apr

Sometimes safety directors find themselves in the situation of having to report to an HR director who is blissfully unaware of safety. If you're one of them, don't despair. There may still be hope. Note on Terminology This article applies not just to HR directors but other persons within an organization that a safety director might have to report to. The Problem of the Uninformed HR Director I'm not suggesting that all HR directors are completely uninformed about safety. I'm…

31
Mar

Computers are making ever-increasing inroads into all aspects of life, including occupational safety and health. "The phrase 'information at your fingertips' has never been truer than with today's table (computer) technology," according to the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE). In a recent edition of ASSE's Professional Safety publication, authors David Fender and Clinton Wolfley outline three tablet applications which they find most useful in their roles as occupational health and safety professionals in the field. They focused on applications…

26
Mar

Or, 10 Things You Wish You Heard More Often As a safety manager, you've organized enough safety meetings to know what to expect.  But for your reference and entertainment, we've put together a top ten list of things you shouldn't be waiting to hear at your next safety meeting. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.